It said the policy was made in accordance with the provisions made in the 1992 Constitution guaranteeing freedom of religion, worship and belief in Article 21(1)(c).
The Constitution states: “All persons shall have the right to Freedom to practice any Religion and to manifest such practice,” a statement issued and signed by Mr Jacob A.M. Kor, the Acting Director-General of GES, and copied to the Ghana News Agency on Wednesday, said.

The statement said it was wrong for any head of institution to deny the right of any Muslim student to practice their religion, which includes wearing of the hijab.

It said: “The management of the GES had noted with great concern, allegations published by the newspapers attributed to the Muslim youth in the Western Region, pre-eminent among them were:

“Muslim girls are prevented from wearing the hijab or traditional scarf to cover their hair, neck and face in accordance with the Muslim religion.

 “Muslim students are forced to take part in Christian activities especially church services when they do not share the same faith.

 “Muslim students are not encouraged to practice their religion in mission schools”.

The statement, however, said the rules and good conduct of every school must always be adhered to, by every student. 

 “There is no gain saying the fact that parents, guardians and candidates select schools based on their own choice and should, therefore, be ready to abide by the rules of the schools, which were made to instill discipline in our students,” it said.

The heads of schools are, therefore, enjoined not to compromise on discipline in their schools.

“The management of the GES takes this opportunity to assure all Ghanaians that we are still committed to the provision of quality education for the Ghanaian child and we will spare no effort to engage all stakeholders, including the Muslim leadership, to achieve this quest,” the statement said.

Source: GNA